Indie Photobook Library at the PPAC Book Fair

The Indie Photobook Library has been invited to participate in the PPAC Second Annual Book Fair, this Saturday April 2, 2011.

Come visit the Indie Photobook Library
at the Philadelphia Photo Arts Center
1400 N. American St.
Philadelphia, PA 19122

Saturday April 2nd
12-6pm
Free and open to the public

A number of small presses, publishers, and artists will also be there including Blind Spot, Charles Lane Press, Chad Muthard, David Graham, David La Spina, Gottlund Verlag, Hassla Books, J&L Books, Ofer Wolberger, Ed Snyder, Roma Publications, A-Jump Books, Humble Arts Foundation, Lay Flat, and PhotoBookArts, to name a few.

The following titles from the Indie Photobook Library archive will be on display.

10: 10 Years of in-Public
38 Very Small Observations, Kevin J. Miyazaki
893 Magazine, Anton Kusters
A Nos Amours, Ariane Geffard and Michael J. DeMeo
Acdcnyc, Nemanja Knežević
Adam Revington
Afghanistan Redux, Benjamin Lowy
Album, Magazin fur Fotografie
Along the Niger, Ian Van Coller
Amnesia Hat Issue 1, Kenneth Traynor
Ankunft bei Aufbruch
Anywhere but Here, Alex Mctigue
Autre Eden, Philippe Lopparelli
B Sides, Stephen Gill
Backdrop: the search for home, Muriel Hasbun
Bedknobs and Broomsticks, Trent Parke
Before Things Change, Seth Fluker
Black Sea of Concrete, Rafal Milach
Blink 1
Blink 2
Burn .01
Carry Me Ohio, Matt Eich
Chica Barbie, Carl Bower
Circulacion
Clinic
Club 13, Nils Petter Lofstedt
Conversations with Dan McNulty in Jersey City, Andrew Bovasso
Couples, Max Fallon
Deathcamp, RJ Shaughnessy
Depressive Landscapes, Armando Ribeiro
Desert Days, Matt Austin
Destination: Anywhere, Jordan Swartz
DIVE, Marco Onofri
Downcasting, Beau Brashares
Drei, Christopher Young
Durations of Time, Bill Purvis
Echolilia, Timothy Archibald
Empty Bottles, WassinkLundgren
Fading Light, Clay Lipsky
Fake Tales of America, Mathieu Lambert
Finds, Harry Watts
Five, Christopher Young
Forest Coast, Ben Grieme and Clarke Tolton
Found Piles & other Topographica, John Steck Jr
Fragments Vol One, John Steck Jr
Fragments Vol Two, Jimmey Leblanc
Freo, Chiara Terraneo
From Here to Oblivion, Stefan Vanthuyne
Gita Lenz
Golden Parachute, Jared Ritz
Grassland, Phil Underdown
Hamra Hajurama: Our Grandmothers
Hasisi Park
Hunt Them Out: Passport to Trespass Vol. VII, Mikael Kennedy
India, Filipe Bianchi
I Sell Fish, Joshua Deaner
I Still Don’t Know Which Way To Go, Jacob Pastrovich
I Thought You Knew Where All of the Elephants Lie Down, Andre Principe
I Want to Eat, Mariken Wessels
Kitintale, Yann Gross
Less is More, Robert Rutod
Living with Myself Forgetting, David Agasi
Lost in Learning, Eva Koleva Timothy
Lukasz Wierzbowski
Manifesto: The Journal of Smogranch, Daniel Milnor
Master and Everyone, Andre Principe
Mauerreste, Squale
Memento, Muriel Hasbun
Memories: Miroir Noir, Yann Orhan
Mornings/Evenings, Todd M Walker
Mosh, Justin Schmitz
Motion Sickness, Alain Marciano
Moving out of State- Reasonable, Scott Hubener
My Brother’s War, Jessica Hines
Nerves, Laetitia Donval
Neuperlach Zentrum, Thomas Wieland
New York City, Squale
Nicosia in Dark and White-Thodoris Tzalavras
Nowhere’s Home, Jordan Sullivan
Nobody is Nowhere, Lara Alegre
Not Many Kingdoms Left, Jeff Luker
Now We Are 30, Stuart Woodman
NY Low and High, Marco Onofri
October 14th, 1979, Mikael Kennedy
On Approach, Daniel Milnor
On This Earth, A Shadow Falls, Nick Brandt
one and two and up and down, Ting Cheng
One to Nothing, Irina Rozovsky
Open Books, Matt Kowal
Orchard Vol 1: Crime Victims Chronicle, Raymond Meeks and Deborah Luster
Owner of this World, Shawn Records
Passport to Trespass Vol. VI, Mikael Kennedy
Photographs and Pictures, Mark Peckmezian
Pluto, Mariko Ogawa
Puur, Melanie Rijkers
Queen Ann P.S .Belly Cut Off, Mariken Wessels
Rugby, Daniel D’Ottavio
Satellite, Pablo Hare
Shibuya, Nguan
Silence, Jose Pedro Cortes
Soundproof, Euan Forrester
Silent Pictures, Pat Graham
Small View, Gu Fan
Some Ways to Disappear Issue 1 and Issue 2
Stapled Photo Grids, David Underwood
Stranger Tongues, Jordan Carroll
Studio, Harry Watts
Svalbard, Greg White
Svart Metall, Grant Willing
Tangente, Laurent Chardon
Tell mum everything is ok, no. 4
Ten Days in July, Maxwell Anderson
The Dad Project, Briony Campbell
The Daily Round, Martin Brink
The Election Project, Simon Roberts
The Family, Stefan Bladh
The Hogtown Project, Nadine Dolly and Kristie Macor
The Kaddu Wasswa Archive, Andrea Stultiens
The Lightness of Being, Alinka Echeverria
The Pier, Nils Petter Lofstedt
The Singled Person
The Story of Four Generations, Yee Ling Tang
The Way Things Are, Anthony Blasko
Thrills & Chills, Isa Leshko
To See Here, Kerim Aytac
Tokyo Tokyo, WassinkLundgren
Transit, Ali Taptik
Unknown Land, Louis Porter
Very Very Short Stories vol. 1 illustrated, Jasmine
Vol. 1, Pauliana Valente Pimentel
Watch Me Jumpstart, Linn Heidi Stokkedal
Waterfall Spring 2010
When We Milk Each Other, Viktoria A. Lisbet
We Between Loss and Hope, Luca Piras
World Was in the Face of the Beloved, Erik Weeks

This selection of photobooks from the iPL collection highlights mostly recent acquisitions to the iPL with a handful of titles featured at the Flash Forward Festival and FotoWeek DC. Selected by Stephanie Obernesser and Larissa Leclair.

Related books:

iPL at the Flash Forward Festival, Toronto, Oct 6-10, 2010
Indie Photobook Library at FotoWeekDC Nov 6-13, 2010
Indie Photobook Library at PPAC Book Fair 2012

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iPL moves to Yale

iPL Yale

The Beinecke Rare Book & Manuscript Library at Yale University recently received, through acquisition and donation, the Indie Photobook Library (iPL), a major collection of photobooks from Larissa Leclair ’03 M.A. The collection includes more than 2,000 photobooks from around the world along with related ephemera, archives of the iPL’s history, and Leclair’s personal collection related to self-publishing.

“We were delighted to work with Larissa to acquire this major archive,” says George Miles, Curator of the Yale Collection of Western Americana at the Beinecke. “These volumes build on an already great strength of the library and will surely be used extensively by scholars and students at Yale and beyond for a long time.”

The iPL focuses on self-published photobooks, imprints independently published and distributed, photography exhibition catalogs, print-on-demand photobooks, artists’ books, zines, photobooks printed on newsprint, limited edition photobooks, non-English language photography books, and more.

“This collection reflects a contemporary movement in publishing,” explains Leclair, who began collecting independently produced photobooks in May 2010, “and it allows for the development of future discourse on trends in self-publishing, the ability to reflect on and compare books in the collection, and for scholarly research to be conducted years, decades, and centuries to come. To have this work now at Yale ensures this legacy.”
Inspired by Wexler’s master class

The catalyst for her collection, Leclair notes, was Yale professor Laura Wexler’s “Photo Memory Workshop” master class at the Beinecke, which focused on Peter Palmquist’s Women in Photography Archive. “He had and his collection will continue to have a big impact on the history of photography specifically relating to women in photography,” said the alumna. “He was one individual collecting independently of an institution, making an impact and shaping history. What he had encapsulated for his collection was what I wanted to do for self-published photobooks.”

“As early as 2005, with photographers Stephen Gill, Rob Hornstra, Jason Fulford, and Alec Soth independently publishing amazing photobooks, there wasn’t a platform for the presentation of self-published titles. So the idea of wishing for a central place to look at self-published photobooks was in my head on the day I saw Peter Palmquist’s collection,” notes Leclair.

The moment spurred her own specific collecting, she says: “I was blown away that a single individual could follow his passion, create a collection, and in the process have an impact on the history of photography. I was not only interested in promoting these kinds of books but most importantly I was very interested in creating an archive for the long-term. So two weeks after that master class, with an idea, one book, and a Facebook page, I founded the indie Photobook Library, a browse-able archive for self-published photobooks.”

For Leclair, placing the iPL at the Beinecke fulfills an aspiration she had from the very beginning. “I always intended that the iPL would one day transfer to an established archive. I wanted it to be preserved and accessible to future photo-bibliophiles long after my lifetime. For the legacy of the photographers and photobooks that collectively make the iPL what it is, I am absolutely thrilled that these artists will be part of the Beinecke’s collecting history.”

[Yale Professor Laura Wexler presented the Larissa Leclair with the 9th Annual Focus Awards' Spotlight Award for far reaching impact in the field of photography, October 2014. (Copyright Griffin Museum of Photography)]

Yale Professor Laura Wexler presented the Larissa Leclair with the 9th Annual Focus Awards’ Spotlight Award for far reaching impact in the field of photography, October 2014. (Copyright Griffin Museum of Photography)
The Beinecke has an renowned collection of 19th century American photographically illustrated books, including such classics as Alexander Gardner’s “Photographic Sketch Book of the Civil War,” A.J. Russell’s “Great West Illustrated,” Josiah Whitney & Carleton Watkins’ “The Yosemite Book,” and Ferdinand Hayden’s “Sun Pictures of Rocky Mountain Scenery,” as well as dozens of other, less well-known examples of the genre.

In the 1920s and 1930s photobooks continued to be a form of artistic expression but also emerged as a major vehicle of social commentary and criticism. The Beinecke holds first editions of such artistic works as Ansel Adams’ “Parmelian Prints of the High Sierra” and Taos Pueblo,” Walker Evans’s “American Photographs,” and Paul Strand’s “Paul Strand.” The Beinecke also boasts a wide range of such politically charged books as Julia Peterkin and Doris Ulman’s collaboration, “Roll Jordan Roll”; James Agee and Walker Evans’ “Let Us Now Praise Famous Men” and “Many are Called”; and Evans’s collaboration with Carleton Beals “The Crime of Cuba.” Yale’s library also holds first editions of all the important Farm Security Administration related books featuring work by Dorothea Lange and Margaret Bourke-White among other photographers.

“Robert Franks’ ‘The Americans’ is often seen as ushering in a new kind of photobook,” Miles observes. “We at the Beinecke have both the French (1958) and American (1959) first editions, as well as a complete collection of every book in which Lee Friedlander has ever published a photograph, while the acquisition of Peter Palmquist’s collection of women photographers brought more than 2,200 photobooks by and about women photographers.”

The iPL is particularly interesting in its own right, according to Miles. “While photobooks became more economical with the emergence of photo mechanical reproduction in the 19th century, they still required considerable investment and with the exception of a few very high-end artistic productions, they were commercial ventures that relied on publishers to underwrite production in the hope/expectation of profitable sales.”

However, the early 21st century emergence of digital photography and ink-jet printing dramatically changed the landscape for photographers looking to present their work in book-form. “Photographers can now self-publish their work in ways unimaginable 15 to 20 years ago,” he emphasizes. “They can distribute them through their websites and book fairs. This has allowed photographers to experiment in content and in form: to share images that commercial publishers might have been reluctant to take on, or to play with sequencing and/or narrative strategies.”

Leclair recognized the potential of this transformation when it was in its infancy and cultivated relationships with photographers. She has been a leader in creating this independent archive and identifying artists important to the contemporary movement in self-publishing, all while curating exhibitions and lecturing throughout the United States and in Canada, Guatemala, Mexico, Australia, the Philippines, and China. The alumna has built an “extraordinarily complete” collection of these books, according to Miles. “The staff at Haas Arts Library and I have been following and collecting photobooks, and when Larissa first approached us, I thought we would have at least half, if not more, of the books in her collection. I was way off. Our searching revealed that we had only around 10% of the collection.”

“Larissa started collecting this material at a critical time, when photographers started to reconsider and experiment with the printed book format through self-publishing,” notes Heather Gendron, director of the Robert B. Haas Family Arts Library at Yale. “A lot of these publications fall outside of typical library acquisition streams, making it a real challenge for librarians to keep up. That’s what makes this Indie Photobook Library so special. On the heels of the reopening of the Beinecke, this broadens the university’s holdings in a very contemporary way.”
“Essential records of human expression”

Miles says that the Beinecke’s growing collection of photobooks, including this new acquisition, complement important creative work across campus collections, such as the Arts Library and galleries, and the curriculum. “These materials in the Indie Photobook Library/Larissa Leclair Collection are essential records of human expression,” he notes, “and the Beinecke works to make sure they are accessible and used by students and scholars through our reading room, classroom visits, and our fellowship programs for graduate students and for visiting postdoctoral scholars.”

Barbara Tannenbaum, curator of photography at the Cleveland Museum of Art has described the Indie Photobook Library as “an indispensable resource for anyone interested in the contemporary photobook.”

The iPL also complements other collections at Yale, Miles adds. “One of the great strengths of the Yale Collection of American Literature are the many examples of poetry and short stories published by small, non-commercial presses throughout the country — ‘Little magazines’ as Pat Willis and Nancy Kuhl call them. They reflect the ways in which American writers have found to share their work. The photobooks in the iPL reflect a similar pattern in the visual arts and scholars will be able to explore and discover how these materials speak to each other and speak to the broader culture.”

Leclair says that the iPL inspired the creation of other independent photobook archives, including the Asia-Pacific Photobook Archive; influenced museum photobook exhibitions; and spawned the promotion and celebration of self-published photobooks. “I’m thrilled that the photographers in the iPL who challenged and subsequently shaped the current publishing industry will add to the continuum of printed expression at Yale along with cuneiform tablets, the Gutenberg Bible, Fox Talbot’s ‘Pencil of Nature,’ and works by Robert Frank and Ed Ruscha — adding to that Soth, Fulford, Fujii, de Middel, Galjaard, Cartegena, and Sancari, among many others,” she says.

With the iPL now part of the Beinecke collections, Leclair will promote its use with the library’s curators and collaborate on curriculum. The entity of the iPL is closed to submissions now, existing as a unique look at self-publishing from around 2008 to 2016. Leclair will continue to look at new titles and work directly with museums and libraries to collect self-published titles from around the world, directly connecting collectors and makers and shaping photobook history.

“Ahead of her time, Larissa’s farsighted vision will benefit future generations of photographers and scholars to come,” states Elizabeth Avedon, independent curator and photobook designer.

For more information on the Beinecke Library, visit: http://beinecke.library.yale.edu

Exhibition Catalog for “A Survey of Documentary Styles in Early 21st Century Photobooks”

More about the exhibition here, here and here.
Order the book here.
Thank you to Patrick Aguilar of Owl & Tiger Books who did such an outstanding job designing the iPL’s first exhibition catalog!

“…the Indie Photobook Library is fast becoming one of Washington’s more interesting small collections.” – Mark Jenkins, Washington Post Express, November 9, 2011

America in Color

America in Color

Title: America in Color

Photographer/s: Brian Dailey

Contributor/s: Wendy Grossman, Klaus Ottmann

Date of publication: 2013

Grìmsey

Grimsey

Title: Grìmsey

Photographer/s: Cole Barash

Contributor/s: Ian Frisch

Date of publication: 2015

Grays the Mountain Sends (Second Edition)

Grays the Mountain Sends 2

Title: Grays the Mountain Sends (Second Edition)

Photographer/s: Bryan Schutmaat

Date of publication: 2014

Islands of the Blest

Islands of the Blest

Title: Islands of the Blest

Photographer/s: various

Date of publication: 2014

L.A., 1971

LA 1971

Title: L.A., 1971

Photographer/s: Anthony Hernandez

Date of publication: 2014

Transmission

Title: Transmission

Photographer/s: Lucy Helton

Date of publication: 2015

NEWFOTOSCAPES

NewFotoScapes

Title: NEWFOTOSCAPES

Photographer/s: Jonathan Shaw

Contributor/s: Andy Adams, David Campbell, Charlotte Cotton, Donall Curtin & Nathaniel Pitt, Mishka Henner, Francis Hodgson, Dewi Lewis, Stephen Mayes, Katrina Sluis

Date of publication: 2014

Crash

Crash

Title: Crash

Photographer/s: Jonathan Shaw

Contributor/s: Foreword: Stephen Snoddy and Stephen Dutton Essay: Jean Baird

Date of publication: July 2009

(re)collect

recollect

Title: (re)collect

Photographer/s: Jonathan Shaw

Contributor/s: Foreword: Debra Klomp, Essay: Peter Ride, Essay: Jean Baird

Date of publication: 2006